Seneca to Lucilius: 63, on grief for lost friends

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Have you ever lost a friend? If so, you are lucky, because it means you had a friend in the first place. And friendship, according to the Stoics (but also Aristotle and the Epicureans, not to mention Confucians), are a major source of joy and meaning in life. That said, you may be taken aback when you read the beginning of Seneca’s 63rd letter to his friend Lucilius, where he says:

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by Massimo Pigliucci. Practical philosophy, science, pseudoscience & good reasoning. Complete index of articles at https://massimopigliucci.blog/essays/

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Philosophy as a Way of Life

Philosophy as a Way of Life

by Massimo Pigliucci. Practical philosophy, science, pseudoscience & good reasoning. Complete index of articles at https://massimopigliucci.blog/essays/

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